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Online Banking Security Tips and Requirements
Passwords are becoming increasingly easy to compromise.  They can often be stolen, guessed, and hacked. To enhance online banking security all users will be required to change their online banking password once every 90 days.
Password requirements are a minimum of 8 characters and include a combination of at least one number, special character, upper case and lowercase letter.
Tips for keeping your password secure:
  1. Avoid using obvious personal information.
  2. Make your password a complex phrase.
  3. Use different passwords for each of your logins.
  4. Use a secure password keeper or manager.
  5. Keep your password private and secure.
  6. Do NOT reuse passwords.
Device security Tips:
  1. Make sure your anti-virus on your devices are up to date.
  2. Always log off your device
  3. Avoid entering passwords on computers you don’t control (like computers at an Internet café or library).
  4. Avoid entering passwords when using unsecured Wi-Fi connections (like at the airport or coffee shop).
Thank you for your cooperation in assisting to keep your accounts
safe and secure. 
Cybersecurity Awareness
Know How to Protect Yourself From Cybercrime
Cyber-attacks are becoming more and more sophisticated and common. According to the 2018 Norton Cyber Security Insights Report, 152 million U.S. consumers were victims of cybercrime – more than half of the country’s adult online population – with losses totaling nearly $11.3 billion. In recognition of National Cybersecurity Awareness Month, First Bank of Baldwin is highlighting seven tips to help consumers protect themselves against online fraud.
  • Keep your computers and mobile devices up to date.  Having the latest security software, web browser, and operating system are the best defenses against viruses, malware, and other online threats. Turn on automatic updates so you receive the newest fixes as they become available.
  • Establish strong passwords. A strong password is at least 8 to 12 characters and includes a mix of upper and lowercase letters, numbers and special characters. Avoid using passwords based on personal or easily accessible information, such as names, birthdays and common phrases (such as “1234” or “Password”) and never share passwords with coworkers, family or friends. Use different passwords for each account and change them regularly.
  • Watch out for phishing scams. Phishing scams use fraudulent emails and websites to trick users into disclosing private account or login information. Do not click on links or open any attachments or pop-up screens from sources you are not familiar with. Also, look for common red flags such as misspellings, grammatical errors, requests marked as “Urgent!” or “sensitive”, and/or emails from personal email addresses rather than a business email account.
  • Recognize and avoid bogus website links. Cybercriminals embed malicious links to download malware onto devices and/or route users to bogus websites. Hover over suspicious links to view the actual URL that you are being routed to. Fraudulent links are often disguised by simple changes in the URL.
  • Keep personal information personal. Hackers can use social media profiles to figure out your passwords and answer those security questions in the password reset tools. Lock down your privacy settings and avoid posting things like birthdays, addresses, mother’s maiden name, etc. Be wary of requests to connect from people you do not know.
  • Secure your internet connection. Always protect your home wireless network with a password. When connecting to public Wi-Fi networks, be cautious about what information you are sending over it.
  • Shop safely. Before shopping online, make sure the website uses secure technology. When you are at the checkout screen, verify that the web address begins with https. Also, check to see if a tiny locked padlock symbol appears on the page.
  • Read the site’s privacy policies. Though long and complex, privacy policies tell you how the site protects the personal information it collects. If you don’t see or understand a site’s privacy policy, consider doing business elsewhere.
Locally owned since 1883, First Bank of Baldwin is dedicated to helping our customers stay safe from fraud.  
First Bank of Baldwin; First for your family, farm or business. Member FDIC
715-684-3366

Someone asks you to donate money to a charity. Today!

Someone contacts you asking for a donation to their charity. It sounds like a group you’ve heard of, it seems real, and you want to help.

How can you tell what charity is legitimate and what’s a scam? Scammers want your money quickly. Charity scammers often pressure you to donate right away. They might ask for cash, and might even offer to send a courier or ask you to wire money. Scammers often refuse to send you information about the charity, give you details, or tell you how the money will be used. They might even thank you for a pledge you don’t remember making.

Here’s what you can do:

  1. Take your time. Tell callers to send you information by mail. For requests you get in the mail, do your research. Is it a real group? What percentage of your donation goes to the charity? Is your donation tax-deductible? How do they want you to pay? Rule out anyone who asks you to send cash or wire money. Chances are, that’s a scam.
  2. Pass this information on to a friend. It’s likely that nearly everyone you know gets charity solicitations. This information could help someone else spot a possible scam.

Do’s and Don’ts of Charitable Giving

DO

  • Do your own research online. The FTC recommends searching for a charity’s name or a cause you want to support (like “animal welfare” or “homeless kids”) with terms such as “highly rated charity,” “complaints” and “scam.”
  • Do pay attention to the charity’s name and web address. Scammers often mimic the names of familiar, trusted organizations to fool donors.
  • Do ask how much of your donation goes to overhead and fundraising. One rule of thumb, used by Wise Giving Alliance, is that at least 65 percent of a charity’s total expenses should go directly to serving its mission.
  • Do keep a record of your donations and regularly review your credit card account to make sure you weren’t charged more than you agreed to give or unknowingly signed up for a recurring donation.

Don’t

  • Don’t give personal and financial information like your Social Security number, date of birth or bank account number to anyone soliciting a donation. Scammers use that data to steal money and identities.
  • Don’t make a donation with cash or by gift card or wire transfer. Credit cards and checks are safer.
  • Don’t click on links in unsolicited email, Facebook or Twitter fundraising messages; they can unleash malware.
  • Don’t donate by text without confirming the phone number on the charity’s official website.
  • Don’t assume pleas for help on social media or on crowdfunding sites such as GoFundMe are legitimate, especially in the wake of disasters. The FTC warns that fraudsters use real victims’ stories and pictures to con people.

 

 

Please Report Scams

If you spot a scam, please report it to the Federal Trade Commission by calling the FTC at 1-877-FTC-HELP (1-877-382-4357) or TTY 1-866-653-4261. Your report can help protect other people. By reporting fraud, you can help the FTC’s investigators identify scammers and stop them before they can get someone’s hard-earned money. It really makes a difference.

*Article found on the Federal Trade Commission website.  To formally report fraud or find out more information about types of fraud visit www.consumer.ftc.gov

You get a card, a call, or an email telling you that you won! Maybe it’s a trip or a prize, a lottery or a sweepstakes. The person calling is so excited and can’t wait for you to get your winnings.

But here’s what happens next: they tell you there’s a fee, some taxes, or customs duties to pay. And then they ask for your credit card number or bank account information, or they ask you to wire money.

Either way, you lose money instead of winning it. You don’t ever get that big prize. Instead, you get more requests for money, and more promises that you won big.

Here’s what you can do:

  1. Keep your money — and your information — to yourself. Never share your financial information with someone who contacts you and claims to need it. And never wire money to anyone who asks you to.
  2. Pass this information on to a friend. You probably throw away these kinds of scams or hang up when you get these calls. But you probably know someone who could use a friendly reminder.

Please Report Scams

If you spot a scam, please report it to the Federal Trade Commission by calling the FTC at 1-877-FTC-HELP (1-877-382-4357) or TTY 1-866-653-4261. Your report can help protect other people. By reporting fraud, you can help the FTC’s investigators identify the scammers and stop them before they can get someone’s hard-earned money. It really makes a difference.

*Article found on the Federal Trade Commission website.  To formally report fraud or find out more information about types of fraud visit www.consumer.ftc.gov

You get a call or an email. It might say you’ve won a prize. It might seem to come from a government official. Maybe it seems to be from someone you know — your grandchild, a relative or a friend. Or maybe it’s from someone you feel like you know, but you haven’t met in person — say, a person you met online who you’ve been writing to.

Whatever the story, the request is the same: wire money to pay taxes or fees, or to help someone you care about. But is the person who you think it is? Is there an emergency or a prize? Judging by the complaints to the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), the answer is no. The person calling you is pretending to be someone else.

Here’s what you can do:

  1. Stop. Check it out — before you wire money to anyone. Call the person, the government agency, or someone else you trust. Get the real story. Then decide what to do. No government agency will ever ask you to wire money.
  2. Pass this information on to a friend. You may not have gotten one of these calls or emails, but the chances are you know someone who has.

Please Report Scams

If you spot a scam, please report it to the Federal Trade Commission by calling the FTC at 1-877-FTC-HELP (1-877-382-4357) or TTY 1-866-653-4261. Your report can help protect other people. By reporting fraud, you can help the FTC’s investigators identify the imposters and stop them before they can get someone’s hard-earned money. It really makes a difference.

*Article found on the Federal Trade Commission website.  To formally report fraud or find out more information about types of fraud visit www.consumer.ftc.gov

Grandkid Scams

You get a call: “Grandma, I need money for bail.” Or money for a medical bill. Or some other kind of trouble. The caller says it’s urgent — and tells you to keep it a secret.

But is the caller who you think it is? Scammers are good at pretending to be someone they’re not. They can be convincing: sometimes using information from social networking sites, or hacking into your loved one’s email account, to make it seem more real. And they’ll pressure you to send money before you have time to think.

Here’s what you can do:

  1. Stop. Check it out. Look up your grandkid’s phone number yourself, or call another family member.
  2. Pass this information on to a friend. You may not have gotten one of these calls, but chances are you know someone who will get one — if they haven’t already.

Please Report Scams

If you spot a scam, please report it to the Federal Trade Commission. Report a scam online or call the FTC at 1-877-FTC-HELP (1-877-382-4357) or TTY 1-866-653-4261. Your complaint can help protect other people. By filing a complaint, you can help the FTC’s investigators identify the imposters and stop them before they can get someone’s hard-earned money. It really makes a difference.

*Article found on the Federal Trade Commission website.  To formally report fraud or find out more information about types of fraud visit www.consumer.ftc.gov

IRS Imposter Scams

You get a call from someone who says she’s from the IRS. She says that you owe back taxes. She threatens to sue you, arrest or deport you, or revoke your license if you don’t pay right away. She tells you to put money on a prepaid debit card and give her the card numbers.

The caller may know some of your Social Security number. And your caller ID might show a Washington, DC area code. But is it really the IRS calling?

No. The real IRS won’t ask you to pay with prepaid debit cards or wire transfers. They also won’t ask for a credit card over the phone. And when the IRS first contacts you about unpaid taxes, they do it by mail, not by phone. And caller IDs can be faked.

Here’s what you can do:

  1. Stop. Don’t wire money or pay with a prepaid debit card. Once you send it, the money is gone. If you have tax questions, go to irs.gov or call the IRS at 800-829-1040.
  2. Pass this information on to a friend. You may not have gotten one of these calls, but the chances are you know someone who has.

Please Report Scams

If you spot a scam, please report it to the Federal Trade Commission. Report a scam online or call the FTC at 1-877-FTC-HELP (1-877-382-4357) or TTY 1-866-653-4261. Your complaint can help protect other people. By filing a complaint, you can help the FTC’s investigators identify the imposters and stop them before they can get someone’s hard-earned money. It really makes a difference.

*Article found on the Federal Trade Commission website.  To formally report fraud or find out more information about types of fraud visit www.consumer.ftc.gov

Online Dating Scams

You meet someone special on a dating website. Soon he wants to move off the dating site to email or phone calls. He tells you he loves you, but he lives far away — maybe for business, or because he’s in the military.

Then he asks for money. He might say it’s for a plane ticket to visit you. Or emergency surgery. Or something else urgent.

Scammers, both male and female, make fake dating profiles, sometimes using photos of other people — even stolen pictures of real military personnel. They build relationships — some even fake wedding plans — before they disappear with your money.

Here’s what you can do:

  1. Stop. Don’t send money. Never wire money, put money on a prepaid debit card, or send cash to an online love interest. You won’t get it back.
  2. Pass this information on to a friend. You may not have gotten one of these calls, but chances are you know someone who will get one — if they haven’t already.

Please Report Scams

If you spot a scam, please report it to the Federal Trade Commission. Report a scam online or call the FTC at 1-877-FTC-HELP (1-877-382-4357) or TTY 1-866-653-4261. Your complaint can help protect other people. By filing a complaint, you can help the FTC’s investigators identify the imposters and stop them before they can get someone’s hard-earned money. It really makes a difference.

*Article found on the Federal Trade Commission website.  To formally report fraud or find out more information about types of fraud visit www.consumer.ftc.gov

Tech Support Scams

You get a call from someone who says he’s a computer technician. He might say he’s from a well-known company like Microsoft, or maybe your internet service provider. He tells you there are viruses or other malware on your computer. He says you’ll have to give him remote access to your computer or buy new software to fix it.

But is the caller who he says he is? Judging by the complaints to the Federal Trade Commission, no. These scammers might want to sell you useless services, steal your credit card number, or get access to your computer to install malware, which could then let them see everything on your computer.

Here’s what you can do:

  1. Hang up. Never give control of your computer or your credit card information to someone who calls you out of the blue
  2. Pass this information on to a friend. You might know these calls are fakes, but chances are you know someone who doesn’t.

Please Report Scams

If you spot a scam, please report it to the Federal Trade Commission. Report a scam online or call the FTC at 1-877-FTC-HELP (1-877-382-4357) or TTY 1-866-653-4261. Your complaint can help protect other people. By filing a complaint, you can help the FTC’s investigators identify the imposters and stop them before they can get someone’s hard-earned money. It really makes a difference.

*Article found on the Federal Trade Commission website.  To formally report fraud or find out more information about types of fraud visit www.consumer.ftc.gov

Home Repair Scams

Here’s how they work:

Someone knocks on your door or calls you. They say they can fix your leaky roof, install new windows, or provide the latest energy-efficient solar panels. They might find you after a flood, windstorm or other natural disaster. They pressure you to act quickly, might ask you to pay in cash, or offer to get you financing.

But here’s what happens next: they run off with your money and never make the repairs. Or they do shoddy repairs that make things worse. Maybe they even put you in a bad financing agreement that puts your house at risk.

Here’s what you can do:

  1. Stop. Check it out. Before making home repairs, ask for references, licenses and insurance. Get three written estimates. Don’t start work until you have a signed contract. And don’t pay by cash or wire transfer.
  2. Pass on this information to a friend. You may see through these scams. But chances are you know someone who could use a friendly reminder.

Want to know more? Sign up for consumer alerts at ftc.gov/subscribe.

Please Report Scams

If you spot a scam, please report it to the Federal Trade Commission.

  • Call the FTC at 1-877-FTC-HELP (1-877-382-4357) or TTY 1-866-653-4261.
  • Go online: ftc.gov/complaint

Your report can help protect other people. By reporting fraud, you can help the FTC’s investigators identify the scammers and stop them before they can get someone’s hard-earned money. It really makes a difference.

*Article found on the Federal Trade Commission website.  To formally report fraud or find out more information about types of fraud visit www.consumer.ftc.gov

You see an ad on TV, telling you about a new law that requires you to get a new health care card. Maybe you get a call offering you big discounts on health insurance. Or maybe someone says they’re from the government, and she needs your Medicare number to issue you a new card.

Scammers follow the headlines. When it’s Medicare open season, or when health care is in the news, they go to work with a new script. Their goal? To get your Social Security number, financial information, or insurance number.

So take a minute to think before you talk: Do you really have to get a new health care card? Is that discounted insurance a good deal? Is that ‘government official’ really from the government? The answer to all three is almost always: No.

Here’s what you can do:

  1. Stop. Check it out. Before you share your information, call Medicare (1-800-MEDICARE), do some research, and check with someone you trust. What’s the real story?
  2. Pass this information on to a friend. You probably saw through the requests. But chances are you know someone who could use a friendly reminder.

Please Report Scams

If you spot a health care scam, please report it to the Federal Trade Commission by calling the FTC at 1-877-FTC-HELP (1-877-382-4357) or TTY 1-866-653-4261. Your report can help protect other people. By reporting fraud, you can help the FTC’s investigators identify scam artists and stop them before they can access to a friend’s hard-earned money. It really makes a difference.

*Article found on the Federal Trade Commission website.  To formally report fraud or find out more information about types of fraud visit www.consumer.ftc.gov

Identity Theft

Someone gets your personal information and runs up bills in your name. They might use your Social Security or Medicare number, your credit card, or your medical insurance — along with your good name.

How would you know? You could get bills for things you didn’t buy or services you didn’t get. Your bank account might have withdrawals you didn’t make. You might not get bills you expect. Or, you could check your credit report and find accounts you never knew about.

Here’s what you can do:

  1. Protect your information. Put yourself in another person’s shoes. Where would they find your credit card or Social Security number? Protect your personal information by shredding documents before you throw them out, by giving your Social Security number only when you must, and by using strong passwords online.
  2. Read your monthly statements and check your credit. When you get your account statements and explanations of benefits, read them for accuracy. You should recognize what’s there. Once a year, get your credit report for free from AnnualCreditReport.com or 1-877-322-8228. The law entitles you to one free report each year from each credit reporting company. If you see something you don’t recognize, you will be able to deal with it.

Please Report Scams

If you suspect identity theft, act quickly. Please report it to the Federal Trade Commission. Report identity theft online or call the FTC at 1-877-FTC-HELP (1-877-382-4357) or TTY 1-866-653-4261. The FTC operator will give you the next steps to take. Visit ftc.gov/idtheft to learn more.

*Article found on the Federal Trade Commission website.  To formally report fraud or find out more information about types of fraud visit www.consumer.ftc.gov

Unwanted Calls

Here’s how they work:

You pick up the phone and hear a recorded message — a robocall — or a live person selling something. Maybe it’s not who your caller ID said it was. It’s frustrating, and you just want it to stop.

Recorded sales calls are illegal, unless you give a business written permission to robocall you. If your number is on the Do Not Call Registry, you’re not supposed to get any sales calls — live or recorded. But scammers ignore the rules about when and how they can call you.

Scammers can use technology to make their calls look like they come from anywhere: the IRS, a business you know, a neighbor, or even your own number. Because phone numbers can be faked, you can’t trust your caller ID. So now what?

Here’s what you can do:

  1. Hang up. Don’t press a number. Just hang up the phone on unwanted calls. Consider call-blocking services to reduce the number of unwanted calls you get. Ask your phone carrier about call blocking and read expert reviews about your options. Learn more at ftc.gov/calls.
  2. Pass this information on to a friend. You may know what to do about unwanted calls, but chances are you know someone who doesn’t.

Please Report Scams

If you get scam calls or illegal robocalls, please report them to the Federal Trade Commission.

Call the FTC at 1-877-FTC-HELP (1-877-382-4357) or TTY 1-866-653-4261.

Go online: ftc.gov/complaint

Your report can help protect other people. By reporting fraud, you can help the FTC’s investigators identify the scammers and stop them before they can get someone’s hard-earned money. It really makes a difference.

*Article found on the Federal Trade Commission website.  To formally report fraud or find out more information about types of fraud visit www.consumer.ftc.gov

Money Mule Scams

Here’s how they work:

Someone might offer you a job. Or say you’ve won a sweepstakes. Or start an online relationship with you. Whatever the story, next they want to send you money – and then ask you to send it on to someone else. They often say to wire the money or use gift cards.

But that money is stolen. And there never was a job, a prize, or a relationship – only a scam. That scammer was trying to get you to be what some people call a “money mule.”

If you deposit a scammer’s check, it might clear. But later, when the bank finds out it’s a fake check, you’ll have to repay the bank. And if you help a scammer move stolen money – even if you didn’t know it was stolen – you could get into legal trouble.

Here’s what you can do:

  1. Keep your money to yourself. Never agree to move money for someone who contacts you, even if they promise a relationship, job, or prize. You could lose money and get in legal trouble.
  1. Pass on this information to a friend. You may see through these scams. But chances are you know someone who could use a friendly reminder.

Want to know more? Sign up for consumer alerts at ftc.gov/subscribe.

Please Report Scams

If you suspect identity theft, act quickly. Please report it to the Federal Trade Commission. Report identity theft online or call the FTC at 1-877-FTC-HELP (1-877-382-4357) or TTY 1-866-653-4261. The FTC operator will give you the next steps to take. Visit ftc.gov/idtheft to learn more.

*Article found on the Federal Trade Commission website.  To formally report fraud or find out more information about types of fraud visit www.consumer.ftc.gov

Work-at-Home Scams

Here’s how they work:

You see an ad saying you can earn big money at home. Or one that offers help starting an online business – with a proven system to make money online. Or maybe your resume is on a job search website and someone calls: they want your driver’s license and bank account numbers before they interview you.

What happens next? If you answer the ad to work from home, they’ll ask you for money – for training or special access. But there’ll be no job. If you buy that proven system, you’ll get pressure to pay more for extra services. But you won’t get anything that really helps you start a business or make money. And if you give that caller your driver’s license and bank account numbers, they might steal your identity or your money.

Here’s what you can do:

  1. Stop. Check it out. Never pay money to earn money. And don’t share personal information until you’ve done your research. Search online for the company name and the words “review,” “scam” or “complaint.”
  2. Pass this information on to a friend. You probably know how to keep your money and information safe. But you may know someone who could use a friendly reminder.

Want to know more?

Sign up for FTC Consumer Alerts at FTC.gov/subscribe.

Please Report Scams

If you spot a scam, please report it to the Federal Trade Commission.

  • Call the FTC at 1-877-FTC-HELP (1-877-382-4357) or TTY 1-866-653-4261.
  • Go online: ftc.gov/complaint

Your complaint can help protect other people. By filing a complaint, you can help the FTC’s investigators identify the scammers and stop them before they can get someone’s hard-earned money. It really makes a difference.

*Article found on the Federal Trade Commission website.  To formally report fraud or find out more information about types of fraud visit www.consumer.ftc.gov

Tuesday, July 30, 2019

Eric Skrum

Capital One Data Breach: Tips Offered by WI Banking Industry

The Capital One data breach affects millions of consumers, and Wisconsin’s banking industry stands ready to assist their customers. It is the banks in Wisconsin and across the nation that shield their customers from the financial harm caused by data breaches. It is as simple as this: when a breach occurs, banks often bear the brunt of the costs so their customers won’t have to.

“Have I been compromised?” is the biggest question on consumers’ minds. The Wisconsin Bankers Association offers the following tips for consumers who are not sure if their information has been compromised, as well as steps for consumers who know their information was stolen:

Not sure if your information has been compromised?

  1. Check all your accounts via online services provided by your bank or credit card provider and not just your Capital One account. If you don’t have access to or haven’t set up an online account, you can call the company directly for assistance in reviewing your accounts. Consumers should be looking for any discrepancies in their purchasing habits. Be sure to do this over the next few months! Just because the bad guys have your information now doesn’t mean they will use it immediately.
  2.  Monitor your accounts closely and frequently. Balance your checkbook monthly and match credit card statements with receipts. By viewing accounts online and checking throughout the month, you’ll be able to identify possible problems sooner.
  3. Review your credit report every three or four months. You are entitled to one free credit report from each of the three major credit bureaus per year. Request a single report from one of the bureaus every three or four months. By staggering these requests, you can monitor your credit throughout the year.

You know your information has been compromised:

  1. Contact the security departments of your creditors or bank to close the compromised account(s). Explain that you are a victim of identity theft and a particular card or account has been compromised. Ask them to provide documentation that the account has been closed. You should also follow up with a letter to the agency documenting your request.
  2. Contact the three major credit bureaus (Experian, Trans Union and Equifax) via phone immediately to request a fraud alert be placed on your file. Once again, explain that you are a victim of identity theft and ask that they grant no new credit without your approval. Again, follow up with a letter to the agency documenting your request.
  3. File a report with your local police department and request a copy of the report. This is good documentation to have on hand to prove your identity has been stolen as you begin the process of restoring your credit and good name.
  4. Document all your actions and keep copies of everything.

Whether you are sure or unsure your financial information has been compromised, one of your first calls should be to your bank. Your bank has a variety of resources available for customers that can help with situations like these. Their staff are also knowledgeable and more than willing to help.

Capital One has created a resource webpage that may be helpful to consumers as well. It can be found at www.capitalone.com/facts2019.

Contact information for the three major credit bureaus.

Experian
www.experian.com

TransUnion
www.transunion.com

Equifax
www.equifax.com

 

Introducing Person-2-Person Payments

This FREE service is available through online banking or via our FBB Mobile App. You can send money easily to friends or family and it’s faster than writing checks and safer than sending cash!  The person you are paying only needs to have a debit card to process the transaction.

Simple Steps:

  • Login to Online Banking or the FBB Mobile App
  • Select the Move Money tab
  • Click New Transaction
  • Select your from checking account
  • Click +Add New Payee
  • Select Person to Person
  • Fill out required payee information
  • The payee will receive a message to enter their debit card information.
  • Once the payee completes the previous step you can initiate a new payment.

P2P Agreement acceptance required before first use

P2P Limits:

$500.00 Per Transaction
$1000.00 Per Day
$3000.00 Per Rolling 7 Days
$5000.00 Per Rolling 30 Days

Like many people, you may not be in the habit of carrying cash. With credit and debit cards and online bill pay, why bother? But, how do you pay the sitter? Repay a friend for lunch? With Person to Person (P2P) payments you can send money as easily as you send a text or email message.  P2P payments are fast and secure money transfers to friends, family members or service providers and eliminates the need to carry checks, find an ATM or visit third-party websites to send money.

First Bank of Baldwin’s P2P service is available via the FBB Mobile App or Online Banking. You can send money to anyone you know, using only their name and email address or mobile phone number.  They just need to have a bank debit card.

First Bank of Baldwin (FBB) Debit Cards* are now available to use with any of the following Mobile Wallets:

  • Apple Pay
  • Samsung Pay
  • Google Pay
  • Masterpass
  • Microsoft Wallet
  • Fitbit Pay
  • Garmin Fitpay
  • Merchant Tokenization

 

Most smartphones come with a wallet app preloaded. Follow the easy steps on your device to add your FBB Debit Card.

 

*FINAL STEP: Once the card is added you will be prompted to contact the bank. Please call 800-499-4362 Ext. #247 or ask for Bookkeeping to complete activation of your card for use in your mobile wallet. Bookkeeping is available Monday-Friday 8:00am-5:00pm CST.

 

**Not all merchants accept Mobile Wallet payment.

What You Need to Know About Mobile Wallets

Before you load all your credit/debit cards on to your smart phone and leave your plastic at home, there are some mobile wallet basics you should know.

What is a mobile wallet? A mobile wallet is an app on your mobile device that stores payment information from a credit or debit card, and then allows you to use your device to make purchases. There are a number of different mobile wallets that are compatible with specific devices. Like a credit/debit card, your mobile wallet will only work at retailers that accept your device as a payment method. The major mobile wallets are Apple Pay, Google Pay and Samsung Pay. The apps come integrated in your mobile devices. There are also mobile wallets you can download from the app stores.

The main benefit of mobile wallets is convenience. First, you can store all your payment card information in one place, so you don’t have to carry the cards with you. When ready to pay, open the app, touch your phone to the compatible reader next to a register, and you’re on your way. Mobile wallets are not limited to smart phones and can be loaded on to tablets and smartwatches.

Which mobile wallet should you choose? While there aren’t many mobile wallet choices, there are some options to keep in mind. First, not every mobile device is compatible with mobile wallet technology. If you have an older device, you may have to check with the manufacturer. Also, which device you own will limit which integrated wallet you can use. IPhones have Apple Pay. Android phones have Google Pay. Samsung phones have Samsung Pay. The mobile wallets that come with your devices generally take fewer steps to use and offer a quicker transaction experience.

How do you set up a mobile wallet? Once you choose the mobile wallet you want, setting it up is easy. Basically, you open the app and add the information for each card you want to store in the wallet. Keep in mind that even though you may load up all your credit cards into your mobile wallet, only one of them will be your default payment option. That card will be the one that is used to process a purchase. If you want to use a different card, you will have to change the default card before you make the transaction.

Are mobile wallets secure? Unlike cash, which can be stolen, and credit cards, which can be copied, the card information you load into a mobile wallet is encrypted. In order to make a payment, you have to unlock your device and also type the pass code or use your fingerprint to unlock the mobile wallet. To reduce your risk of fraudulent charges if your device is lost or stolen, make sure to set a strong pass code and enable fingerprint authentication to lock your device once you enable a wallet.

Are there any drawbacks? With the increased convenience and security of mobile wallets, there are some things you should keep in mind. Keep an eye on your battery life. If your device runs out of power, you may get stranded without access to your mobile wallet. Also, because mobile wallets are a newer technology, it may take time for consumer protections to catch up. Depending on the privacy policy, the mobile wallet issuer may collect or share your spending data in ways that aren’t allowed when using a credit card.

Excerpts from US News article written by Steven Abrams published March 16, 2018

 

 

Make it a practice to turn your debit cards Off when not in use.
First Bank of Baldwin is excited to be one of the first Community Banks in Western Wisconsin to offer this advanced technology.
It’s your best defense against debit card fraud. Simply use the FBB Mobile App (or use Online Banking) to control turning your debit card off or on for greater security.*
This convenient control will keep your cards from unauthorized use in the event that someone has fraudulently captured your debit cards numbers.
We have seen many situations at our community bank, where a customer may not be aware that their debit card is being used by thieves to make online or in-store purchases. Please keep an eye on your transactions through your online statement and contact us if you see any fraudulent transactions.
Play it safe and download the app today, available on iTunes or the Google Play store.
*Turning your card Off only impacts future debit card (point of sale and ATM) transactions.  Any previously authorized transactions will be paid, and any recurring transactions you had previously set up will still occur.  Turning your card Off will not affect your checks, mobile, internet banking transfers or bill pay.
For more information please call 800-499-4362.